Archive for the 'Medical Visualization' Category

Beauty in anatomy

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Alexey Kashpersky uses ZBrush to visualize a plethora of anatomical body parts for Radius Digital Science. From models of the human heart to illustrations of cancer cells, these renders offer a fascinating glimpse into the workings of our bones, organs, cells, and appendages. See more stunning images on ZBrush Central.

Alexey’s incredible work was recently featured on the ZBrush Central top row, as well as being showcased on Bechance’s Inspiration Is portal.

Ebola virus 3D animation

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Daniel Enrique de Leon is a uniquely talented digital artist and storyteller, with extensive experience in 3D printing, and a background in biology and clinical emergency medicine. Here, he combines his many talents to create a fantastic 3D animation of Ebola virus molecular anatomy. Everything was done in ZBrush 4R7 (Beta): modeling, rendering, animation, and camera motion.

Learn more about Daniel’s process over on ZBrush Central.

Bigger than T-Rex?

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A documentary that aired on PBS looks at how ZBrush helped recreate the digital skeleton of a Spinosaurus Aegypticus, the biggest predator to ever walk the planet!

Using a CT scanner to digitize the discovered bones, the 3D images captured are accurate to a fraction of a millimeter! Paleoartists can then use ZBrush to assemble a virtual dinosaur. “We have, just now, moved into the digital age for dinosaur reconstruction, in the sense that you can go literally from a bone to a digital model of a bone, to a digital skeleton, which you can simplify enough that you can make it move, you can make it walk, you can ultimately put skin on it,” said Paul Sereno, National Geographic Explorer.

Check out the insightful documentary. At roughly 38 minutes, you’ll see ZBrush in action!

Reconstructing faces with ZBrush

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We are all used to seeing ZBrush used in the media and entertainment industries. But what happens when a child goes missing at 4 years old and his parents want to see what he would look like 28 years later? This is where the Forensic Department at the DHPP in Sao Paulo is responsible for reconstructing the faces of missing people and victims of crime. In this particular open case, the child’s mother requested a progression age job from a photo of the little boy at just 4 years old. From nothing but a low-resolution photograph, Vilson Martins was able to create a 3D model of the boy now aged 32. The image has now been published to try and find him.

It’s not just missing persons, though. Recently, one of the modeling projects involved reconstructing the unrecognizable face of a badly beaten deceased victim. Using tomographic scanning the team was able to create an accurate reconstruction. And after 3 months of investigation, the culprit of the attack was found!

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Learn more about Vilson Martins’ work at www.vmartinsart.com.

Flexing In A New Direction

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You might be taken back to hear that ZBrush artist Chris Jones used Sculptris to help bring this ecorche model to life. Incredibly, you can still download your very own FREE copy of Sculptris here!

Be sure to take a closer look at Chris Jones by visiting his homepage. If you’re looking to add some world class anatomical reference to your design studio or work space, look no further than our Anatomy Tools offerings inside the ZBrush Store.

A View From The Inside

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We see a lot of cool apps and ideas flow through the office on a daily basis. This latest post by ZBSee member, mkonomos takes us into a whole other realm. Developing a surgical app using ZBrush makes learning anatomy a breeze. Find out more about how mkonomos, aka Michael Konomos and his colleagues at the Emory University School of Medicine are changing the way we see the human body, one organ at a time.

Surgical Anatomy of the Liver – iPad App

 

Beetle Mania

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The Beatles hit American shores in the 1960′s and changed the way we listened to music. This Rhino beetle will change the way you see bugs. ZBrushCentral member, RossMccabe delivers a “whole lotta Rosie” with his first post. Check out more renders of the this small earth dweller inside his user gallery. If it’s bugs your into, be sure to check out fellow ZBSee member Eric Keller aka robotball’s latest DVD from the Gnomon Workshop, “Hyper-Reel Insect Design”.

 

Bugging Out With Eric Keller

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Eric Keller is no stranger to the ZBrushCentral forum. In case you don’t already know, he’s even written several books on the subject. Get your copy today!  It’s safe to say the man has an eclectic collection of obsessions and muses. If your squeamish, this thread will have you crawling in your seat. Robotball as he’s known on the ZBrushCentral forum, recently posted a myriad of insect sculptures waiting to get you feeling “icky” all over! This latest collection of work is also available in all its 3D glory inside our Turntable Gallery. Be sure to keep up with Eric Keller’s exploits by visiting his blog. If you are in the Los Angeles area, it’s probably a good idea to try and squeeze your way into one of his classes at the Gnomon School of Visual Effects.

 

Illustrating A New Biological Road Map

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These biological renders are presented as part of the 2012 Visualization Challenge examining HIV. ZBrushCentral artist, Alexey Kashpersky and the small team have recently won 1st Prize for their piece entitled, “Human Immunodeficiency Virus.” Alexey is no one trick pony. His user gallery, under the name R1DD1CK, is filled with ZBrush art covering everything from characters to creatures and more.

You can see more of the entries and watch animations of the molecular processes that cells undergo in the human blood stream when infected, by visiting the CGSociety features page. Fascinating stuff!

Medical and scientific visualization are just some of the ways ZBrush is used to create highly detailed 3d assets. You can learn more about ZBrush and its industry applications inside our Industry page. For a collection of constantly expanding video tutorials and learning resources, be sure to visit ZClassroom. There, you’ll have access to the necessary tools to develop your own scientific illustrations.

 

Preserving The Past

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The limitations faced by historians, archeologists and geologists, are derived from a dependency on available artifacts as primary evidence for telling our past. In many cases, scholars find pieces intact but a whole slew of others remain in a fragmented state. Rebuilding and maintaining these priceless pieces of our natural history is of paramount importance. With technology on their side, scholars are now able to maximize these fragments of our past and reconstruct precious historical narratives using software like ZBrush. Joakim Engel is a Creative Developer at the Natural History Museum of Denmark and member of the Faculty of Science at the University of Copenhagen. He is embracing ZBrush as a tool in the pursuit of this exploration. Joakim explores this new age approach to understanding history in his thesis, “3D Applications in Museological Context”. You can read more about how ZBrush is used in industry on our dedicated User Stories page.

Download the full thesis here.






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